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Showing posts with label counterinsurgency. Show all posts
Showing posts with label counterinsurgency. Show all posts

Tuesday, April 29, 2008

Latest counterinsurgency articles

2 new articles found for: (counterinsurgency or assymetric warfare or insurgenc*)

1. Koran, Kalashnikov, and Laptop: The Neo-Taliban Insurgency in Afghanistan Lester W Grau. The Journal of Military History. Lexington: Apr 2008. Vol. 72, Iss. 2; p. 630 (1 page)
Abstract | Full text Full Text - PDF (57 K)
2. US Special Forces and Counterinsurgency in Vietnam: Military Innovation and Institutional Failure, 1961-1963 Joseph R Fischer. The Journal of Military History. Lexington: Apr 2008. Vol. 72, Iss. 2; p. 620 (3 pages)
Abstract Full text Full Text - PDF (154 K)

Friday, February 29, 2008

New from the Strategic Studies Institute

A number of new publications have been released by the Army's Strategic Studies Institute already this year and you can view each of these in their entirety online. Select this link to browse these new titles.

Titles include:

Wednesday, February 13, 2008

Nagl: Beating Insurgents Takes Unconventional War

"One year ago this week, the U.S. launched the surge in Iraq. The goal was to crack down on a growing insurgency and to create enough "breathing space" for Iraq's fledgling government to advance.There is much debate over whether that surge has worked and what lessons the U.S. military should take from the experience.

Lt. Col. John Nagl has spent a lot of time thinking about how the U.S. should deal with insurgents. Nagl is an expert on counter-insurgency. He spent time in Iraq as an operations officer for a tank battalion in Anbar province and, back home, has been training soldiers to teach and support Afghan and Iraqi forces."

Listen to this interview of LTC John Nagl with NPR's Michelle Norris (7 minutes) about the lessons learned for counter-insurgency.

Tuesday, February 12, 2008

War by Other Means -- Building Complete and Balanced Capabilities for Counterinsurgency

RAND Counterinsurgency Study -- Final Report

"In early 2006, the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) asked RAND’s National Defense Research Institute to conduct a comprehensive study of insurgency and counterinsurgency (COIN), with a view toward how the United States should improve its capabilities for such conflicts in the 21st century. This is the capstone report of that study, drawing from a dozen RAND research papers on specific cases, issues, and aspects of insurgency and COIN. The study included an examination of 89 insurgencies since World War II to learn why and how insurgencies begin, grow, and are resolved. It also analyzed the current challenge of what is becoming known as global insurgency, exemplified by the global jihadist movement, as well as lessons about both insurgency and COIN from a number of cases, including Iraq and Afghanistan..." Read full report

Background: Army Buried Study Faulting Iraq Planning, New York Times

Wednesday, January 23, 2008

RAND Paper: Money in the Bank -- Lessons Learned from Past Counterinsurgency (COIN) Operations

Lessons Learned from Past Counterinsurgency (COIN) Operations

Summary "As insurgent threats evolve and assume new forms, the United States must also evolve in its ability to counter potentially prolonged threats in several parts of the world. Because of the potential for global reach in contemporary insurgencies, the ability to draw on lessons learned from past counterinsurgency (COIN) campaigns using different historical cases can be valuable, helping current and future leaders prevent a repetition of mistakes and building a foundation on which to build contemporary responses. To this end, six historic COIN operations from the 19th and 20th centuries are examined to determine which tactics, techniques, and procedures led to success and which to failure. The Philippines, Algeria, Vietnam, El Salvador, Jammu and Kashmir, and Colombia were chosen for their varied characteristics relating to geography, historical era, outcome, type of insurgency faced, and level of U.S. involvement. Specific issues examined include the counterinsurgents’ ability to innovate and adapt, the need to find a way to recognize the threat, and tactics for confronting it."
Download PDF Full Document

(File size 1.2 MB, 5 minutes modem, <>

Sunday, January 13, 2008

Latest Counterinsurgency Articles

ProQuest

Databases selected: Military Module 4 new articles found for: (counterinsurgency or assymetric warfare or insurgenc*) AND PDN(>12/30/2007)

1. Counterinsurgency and the Global War on Terror: Military Culture and Irregular War William Flavin. Parameters. Carlisle Barracks: Winter 2007/2008. Vol. 37, Iss. 4; p. 144 (3 pages)
Abstract Abstract | Full text Full text | Full Text - PDF Full Text - PDF (157 K)
2. New Challenges and Old Concepts: Understanding 21st Century Insurgency Steven Metz. Parameters. Carlisle Barracks: Winter 2007/2008. Vol. 37, Iss. 4; p. 20 (13 pages)
Abstract Abstract | Full text Full text | Full Text - PDF Full Text - PDF (221 K)
3. The Military and Reconstruction Operations Mick Ryan. Parameters. Carlisle Barracks: Winter 2007/2008. Vol. 37, Iss. 4; p. 58 (13 pages)
Abstract Abstract | Full text Full text | Full Text - PDF Full Text - PDF (215 K)
4. U.S. Army Counterinsurgency and Contingency Operations Doctrine 1942-1976 Robert M Cassidy. Parameters. Carlisle Barracks: Winter 2007/2008. Vol. 37, Iss. 4; p. 129 (3 pages)
Abstract Abstract | Full text Full text | Full Text - PDF Full Text - PDF (157 K)

View all search results - see all results for your search including past articles at ProQuest.

ProQuest

Thursday, January 10, 2008

Lessons Learned from Past Counterinsurgency (COIN) Operations

RAND Counterinsurgency Study -- Paper 4

By: Angel Rabasa, Lesley Anne Warner, Peter Chalk, Ivan Khilko, Paraag Shukla

"As insurgent threats evolve and assume new forms, the United States must also evolve in its ability to counter potentially prolonged threats in several parts of the world. Because of the potential for global reach in contemporary insurgencies, the ability to draw on lessons learned from past counterinsurgency (COIN) campaigns using different historical cases can be valuable, helping current and future leaders prevent a repetition of mistakes and building a foundation on which to build contemporary responses. To this end, six historic COIN operations from the 19th and 20th centuries are examined to determine which tactics, techniques, and procedures led to success and which to failure. The Philippines, Algeria, Vietnam, El Salvador, Jammu and Kashmir, and Colombia were chosen for their varied characteristics relating to geography, historical era, outcome, type of insurgency faced, and level of U.S. involvement. Specific issues examined include the counterinsurgents’ ability to innovate and adapt, the need to find a way to recognize the threat, and tactics for confronting it."

Monday, December 10, 2007

Updated CRS Report on IEDs

Congressional Research Service Report for the Congress - Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) in Iraq and Afghanistan: Effects and Countermeasures November 21, 2007

Summary: Since October 2001, improvised explosive devices (IEDs, roadside bombs, and suicide car bombs) have been responsible for many of Publish Postthe combat deaths in Iraq and Afghanistan.1 Vehicle-borne IEDs and car bombs are now used to strike police stations, markets, and mosques, killing local citizens as well as U.S. troops. U.S. forces counter the devices through utilizing intelligence sources, and by disrupting portions of the radio spectrum that insurgents use to trigger IEDs. Insurgents quickly adapt to countermeasures, and new, more sophisticated IEDs are increasingly being used in both Iraq and Afghanistan. Recent trends show a decrease in the number of IED attacks in Iraq since June 2007, but an increase in the number of effective IED attacks in Afghanistan. Department of Defense (DOD) officials have also charged that Iran may be supplying new IED technology to insurgents in Iraq. There is growing concern that IEDs might eventually be used by other insurgents and terrorists worldwide.2 This report will be updated as events warrant.

Friday, December 7, 2007

Left of Boom series - Rick Atkinson

About this series:

From the Washington Post Website: "...staff writer Rick Atkinson describes the effort by the U.S. military to combat the improvised explosive devices used by insurgents in Afghanistan and Iraq from 2002 until now. Part one describes the effort through the summer of 2004.

The series is drawn from more than 140 interviews over the past six months with military and congressional officials, contractors, scientists and defense analysts in Iraq, Afghanistan, Washington and elsewhere. Most agreed to speak candidly only on the condition of anonymity. Ten senior officers or retired officers, each of them intimately involved in the effort to combat IEDs, were asked to review the findings for accuracy and security considerations."

Part 1 - Summer 2002 - Summer 2004 "The IED problem is getting out of control. We've got to stop the bleeding."

Part 2 - Summer 2004 - Summer 2005 "There was a two-year learning curve . . . and a lot of people died in those two years"

Part 3 - Spring 2005 - Summer 2006 "You can't armor your way out of this problem"

Part 4 - Spring 2006 - Summer 2007 "If you don't go after the network, you're never going to stop these guys. Never."

Tuesday, September 18, 2007

US Army and Marine Corps Counterinsurgency Field Manual

View online from our catalog the US Army and Marine Corps Counterinsurgency Field Manual

This field manual/Marine Corps warfighting publication establishes doctrine (fundamental principles) for military operations in a counterinsurgency (COIN) environment.

Related podcast

Lt. Col. John Nagl, contributor and author of foreword to "The U.S. Army/Marine Corps Counterinsurgency Field Manual" interviewed by Sean Naylor. C-Span After Words - interview of LTC Nagl runs approximately 1 hour.

About this C-Span program: "Lt. Col. John Nagl helped write "The U.S. Army/Marine Corps Counterinsurgency Field Manual," which was prepared under the guidance of Gen. David Petraeus (currently leading the "surge" in Iraq). Lt. Col. Nagl, a veteran of both Opertation Desert Storm and the current war in Iraq, talks about the manual with Sean Naylor, senior writer for Army Times and the author of "Not a Good Day to Die: The Untold Story of Operation Anaconda."

Also in the news: University of Chicago to publish the Counterinsurgency manual

Friday, August 31, 2007

Master of Military Art and Science Theses - 2007 now available online

The MMAS 2007 theses are now available in the CARL Digital Library in the Master of Military Art and Science Theses collection. This collection is accessible at http://cgsc.leavenworth.army.mil/carl/contentdm/home.htm Below is just a sample of some of this year's theses.

  1. Occupation of Germany from 1945 to 1948 versus the occupation of Iraq from 2003 to 2005: is America on a road to success?
  2. Community-oriented policing and counterinsurgency: a conceptual model
  3. Psychological operations supporting counterinsurgency: 4th PSYOP Group in Vietnam.
  4. Border interdiction in counterinsurgency: a look at Algeria, Rhodesia, and Iraq.
  5. Lessons learned from advising the Republic of South Vietnam’s Armed Forces during the Vietnam War.
  6. Analysis of the sources of Islamic extremism
  7. Emerging requirements for U.S. counterinsurgency: an examination of the insurgency in the Niger River Delta region.

Tuesday, August 21, 2007

Senior Officer Professional Digest (SOPD) August Issue : Australian Army

This month the editors of the Australian Army's Senior Officer Professional Digest recommend ten articles drawn from professional and academic journals on the subjects of capitalist-authoritarian powers, China, India, Pakistan, counterinsurgency, terrorism, regime change, Eastern and Western ideas of conflict and civil-military relations.

From the SOPD: "Reading is an intellectual force multiplier for the military profession. Apart from practical operational experience, which is our chief instructor, no other information source can compare with the material to be found in books and professional journals. As far as issues of contemporary importance are concerned, the many high quality professional journals from around the world can provide a small service, such as ours, with many different and valuable points of view."

SOPD Issue No. 52, August 2007 Full text PDF

Contents:

  • The Return of Authoritarian Great Powers
  • Securing Borders
  • China’s Rise in Historical Perspective
  • A Friend Indeed
  • A False Choice in Pakistan
  • Counterterrorism: A Professional’s Strategy
  • The Role of Safe Havens in Islamist Terrorism
  • Terrorism, Regime Change and Just War
  • Good Anthropology, Bad History

Sunday, August 19, 2007

Embedded with US troops in Iraq: Video report

Freelance Journalist Doug Grindle was recently imbedded with a U.S. Army unit responsible for patrolling a rural area just west of Baghdad. The U.S. military has considered this area an al-Qaeda safe haven, and U.S. soldiers are working with the local Sunni population to identify and eliminate insurgents by sharing intelligence and setting up roadside checkpoints manned by local civilians. This vignette includes video of the patrolling, meeting with local leaders, and interviews with the U.S. military. View video 8/17/2007: WASHINGTON, DC: 27 min.

Friday, August 17, 2007

Retaking Sa'ad: Successful Counterinsurgency in Tal Afar

Link to fulltext of article published in the JUL/Aug issue of Armor magazine: Retaking Sa'ad: Successful Counterinsurgency in Tal Afar by MAJ Niel Smith

Article summary: "The article discusses the campaign strategy employed by the U.S. Army Team Battle, 37th (2-37) Armor in a counter-insurgency in Tal Afar. The author explains that after taking over the place from Fox Troop, the unit had to ensure the mobility in alternate supply route, develop Iraqi Army and Iraqi Police capabilities, and defeat the insurgents in the area. After elaborating on the five-phase strategy, the author also provides an account of the lessons learned from the operations."

About the author: "
Major NIeI Smith is currently the operations officer, Army-Marine Counterinsurgency Center, Fort Leavenworth, KS. He received a B.B.A. from James Madison University. His military education includes Armor Officer Basic Course, Armor Captains Career Course, Airborne School, and Combined Arms and Services Staff School. He has served in various command and staff positions, to include assistant S3,1st Brigade, 1st Armored Division, Ramadi, Iraq; commander, Team Battle, 2d Battalion, 37th (2-37) Armor, Friedberg, Germany, and TaI Afar, lraq;S4, 2-37 Armor, Friedberg, Germany; AST commander, Camp Vitina, Kosovo; assistant S3 plans, 1st Brigade, 1st Armored Division, Friedberg; XO, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 25th Infantry Division (Light), Hawaii; and platoon leader, Apache Troop, 3d Squadron, 4th Cavalry, Hawaii."

Tuesday, August 14, 2007

Insurgents, terrorists, and militias : the warriors of contemporary combat

Insurgents, terrorists, and militias : the warriors of contemporary combat by Richard Schultz and Andrea J. Dew

Book review exerpt: "The authors, Richard H. Shultz and Andrea J. Dew, lay out the framework and goals of the book at the very beginning. This book is not about tactics or even strategy, but “operational art”, the middle ground between Strategy (big “S”) and Tactics (big “T”). Using case studies of Somali, Chechnya, Afghanistan, and Iraq, the authors demonstrate their theories through both recent and historical encounters. Some of their analysis is interesting as elements of previous success were clearly not understood and led to later failures." Full Book review: MountainRunner blog

Listen to Andrea Dew's interview on NPR's "The World

Read an interview with Andrea Dew and Richard Shultz.

Read "When Soldiers Fight Warriors," a chapter from Insurgents, Terrorists, and Militias.

Read Shultz and Dew's New York Times op-ed piece, "Counterinsurgency, by the Book".

Monday, August 6, 2007

New at CARL - Utility of Force by Rupert Smith

Author bio: "General Sir Rupert Smith is one of the most senior international practitioners in the use of force. In his forty year career in the British Army he commanded the UK Armoured Division in the 1990-91 Gulf War, was GOC Northern Ireland, commanded the UN forces in Bosnia in 1995, and served as Deputy Commander of NATO. All of this experience informs his book. He retired in 2002."

Book summary: "War no longer exists," writes General Sir Rupert Smith, powerfully reminding us that the clash of mass national armies - the system of war since Napoleon - will never occur again. Instead, he argues in this timely book, we must be prepared to adapt tactics to each conflict, or lose the ability to protect ourselves and our way of life." "From Iraq to the Balkans, and from Afghanistan to Chechnya, Smith charts a stream of armed interventions that have failed to deliver on promises of resolution. He demonstrates why today's conflicts must be understood as intertwined political and military events. He makes clear why the current one-size-fits-all model of total war, fought out on battlefields, that politicians still cling to must be abandoned in favor of new strategies that take into account the fact that wars are now fought among civilian populations. And he offers a compelling new model for how to fight these battles - and secure our world."--BOOK JACKET.

Tuesday, July 31, 2007

John Nagl Interview

About this podcast

Learning to eat soup with a knife by John Nagl

Lieutenant Colonel John Nagl commands the 1st Battalion, 34th Armor at Fort Riley, Kansas. He led a tank platoon in Operation Desert Storm and served as the operations officer of a tank battalion task force in Operation Iraqi Freedom. A West Point graduate and Rhodes Scholar, Nagl earned his doctorate from Oxford University, taught national security studies at West Point, and served as a Military Assistant to the Deputy Secretary of Defense. He is the author of Learning to Eat Soup with a Knife: Counterinsurgency Lessons from Malaya and Vietnam and was on the writing team that produced the Army's new Counterinsurgency Field Manual.

Sunday, July 22, 2007

Newly released: SAMS 2007 Monographs - subject counterinsurgency

We recently completed adding to our Digital Library the monographs of the 2007 graduating class from the School of Advanced Military Studies. Below you'll find a sample of those related to the subject of counterinsurgency.

About the School of Advanced Military Studies

The School of Advanced Military Studies (SAMS) is one of the parts of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College (CGSC). Most SAMS students complete the regular CGSC course, then stay for a second academic year. They write either one or two monographs (depending on the requirement at the time) and are awarded a Master of Military Art and Science (MMAS) graduate degree. Most go on to planning jobs in field units. Currently you can find the 1995-2007 SAMS monographs in our digital library. SAMS monographs typically address historical events, current operational issues, or new organizational concepts.

Thursday, July 5, 2007

What to read about Iraq

In an article published 5 July 2007 in the Christian Science Monitor Middle East correspondents Scott Peterson, Dan Murphy, and Jill Carroll recommend the best books on the Iraq war. See the following links to check our holdings of these titles at the CARL.

Pre-2003

  1. Out of the Ashes: The Resurrection of Saddam Hussein by Andrew Cockburn
  2. Endgame: solving the Iraq problem once and for all by Scott Ritter
  3. Crusade: The Untold Story of the Persian Gulf War by Rick Atkinson
2003 Invasion
  1. Night Draws Near by Anthony Shadid
  2. Generation Kill by Evan Wright
  3. Thunder Run by David Zucchino
  4. Cobra II by Michael Gordon
Current War
  1. Imperial Life in the Emerald City by Rajiv Han­drasekaran
  2. Fiasco by Thomas Ricks
  3. State of Denial by Bob Woodward
Further Background Reading
  1. Learning to Eat Soup with a Knife by John Nagl
  2. The Shia Revival: how conflicts within Islam will shape the future by Vali Nasr
  3. The Looming Tower by Lawrence Wright

Wednesday, June 27, 2007

2006 SAMS Monographs on counterinsurgency

2006 SAMS Monographs on counterinsurgency:

Here is a comprehensive list of COIN, irregular warfare unconventional warfare, low intensity conflict, small wars, peacekeeping operations, and urban operations monographs from the SAMS program going back from 2005 to 1985.

Books in the News

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